Inside the Numbers

You Learn

Bethesda Little Theatre presents an original musical revue featuring songs from all the Broadway shows you’ve been wishing you could see in one night but couldn’t… until now. Come From Away, Six, Dear Evan Hansen, Chicago, Tina: The Tina Turner Musical, Company, Hadestown, Hamilton, and more. We even have some side trips to some of the wonderful music clubs Times Square has to offer. Don’t miss your chance to see numbers from some of the hottest shows on Times Square! A Night Out on Times Square, runs June 10, 11, 12 and 17, 18, 19 at the Montgomery College Cultural Arts Center. (For tickets and more information click here: blt-online.org or call 202-796-3431.)

In our blog series “Inside the Numbers” we take you backstage with the performers to discuss a sampling of the songs they’ll be presenting; today we’re going to explore how the ladies are doing with their take on “You Learn” from Jagged Little Pill featuring the songs of Grammy winner Alanis Morissette.

Tickets at blt-online.org!

To what extent was this song or Alanis Morissette in general a part of your childhood / teenage angst years?

Editor’s Note: Everyone had some teenage angst, right? Seems like Alanis Morissette didn’t make it into our cast’s teenage angst CD collection – what was in yours??

Kathleen: This song in particular was not a part of my teenage years, but I loved Alanis’ sound growing up. My favorite song was always “You Oughta Know” as I felt her pain and angst. 

Brett: I’ll be honest, I hadn’t heard this song until we started learning it for the show! Alanis was not part of my angsty listening rotation.

Marissa: I definitely listened to Alanis Morissette and knew this was her song but I don’t remember having her on repeat at any point, though I did end up learning a lot of her lyrics.

Casting the number

This song covers a lot of how we experience life (love, laugh, cry, choke, bleed) – how does it do this so effectively? Or doesn’t it?

Alicia: The choreography is where a lot of this comes through.  Lauren has done a great job of illustrating the “angsty-ness” through the dance and uses the dance to interpret the love, laugh, cry, choke, bleed. 

Lauren: I think this song really captures how it feels to be human; we’ve all experienced those emotions and you do learn. For me, this song feels more poignant after the last couple of years with the pandemic. So much life happened–and didn’t happen– and I think this song captures those feelings well. 

Marissa: I think one of the things that’s so interesting about this song musically is that laundry list of emotions / verbs are all sung the same way. That repetition really hammers home the fact that through it all – good, bad, even down to the choices you make – the one constant is that you learn from everything.

Kathleen: I feel it takes you through the highs and lows of life. It portrays the hardships yet reminds you that there is a lesson somewhere in all the chaos. 

Brett: This song has such simple lyrics, but they really do capture a lot of the beauty and pain of life. We learn from each experience we have and the music brings out the bittersweetness of that.

Kathleen, Marissa, and Lauren

How does the choreography play into the story this song is telling?

Editor’s Note: Lucky for us, we get to hear from the choreographer herself! Not only to we get the benefit of her insights here, you will get a chance to see her bring her own choreography to life in the show!

Lauren: Well, I tried to choreograph moves that show life is a group event and that the emotions the song talks about are ones that we can all relate to. You’re not alone when you feel like you’re living and learning–even when life gets hard and isn’t going the way you want it to. I hope the choreography enhances the raw emotions discussed in the song.

Marissa: Oh man. Lauren has done such a tremendous job with the choreography. She has made such fluid and beautiful sequences that the depth of the message really comes through. I just hope we can do it justice!

Alicia: The modern dance choreography that Lauren developed helps to tell the story. At times we’re dancing together and at times we’re dancing separate, but it comes together beautifully to tell the story. 

Kathleen: The choreography is set up so that not only do you hear the story telling but you feel it. It aligns with the build up and takes you on the journey. 

Brett: Lauren’s choreography is so beautiful and evocative. She’s captured the emotions behind every line with grace and subtlety.

Brett and Alicia

What’s the hardest part about learning this number?

Brett: The lyrics are repetitive but a little different every time, which can be a challenge to memorize! 

Marissa: Remembering who is singing when and which chairs to move!

Kathleen: I found the hardest part to be learning the song in parts. I’ve come to love this song and I have to stop myself from singing lines that are not assigned to me. 

Alicia: The hardest part about learning this number for me is the music.  It’s such a recognizable song – everyone knows the words and the melody so we all want to make sure we do it justice.  Nailing the harmonies and our respective solo lines is where I’m focusing as we get down to the wire.

Lauren: I think the music has been a hard part to learn for this number. This is such a well-known song so we have how we think it should sound in our head, which isn’t quite what this arrangement is calling for! Also, as the choreographer, I really hope the moves aren’t too hard to learn!

Editor’s Note: Sounds like the verdict is really that it’s the music so Lauren is off the hook!

Kathleen, Lauren, Alicia, and Marissa rehearsing with Jeff

Anything else to add?

Kathleen: I’ve enjoyed working with this team of lovely women and look forward to seeing it all come together. 

Brett: I love working on this song with these incredible women. They make it easy to play old friends, even though some of us just met a few months ago!

Marissa: The people! Such a wonderful group of strong women to make great music and dance together!!

You Could Drive a Person Crazy

Bethesda Little Theatre presents an original musical revue featuring songs from all the Broadway shows you’ve been wishing you could see in one night but couldn’t… until now. Come From Away, Six, Dear Evan Hansen, Chicago, Tina: The Tina Turner Musical, Company, Hadestown, Hamilton, and more. We even have some side trips to some of the wonderful music clubs Times Square has to offer. Don’t miss your chance to see numbers from some of the hottest shows on Times Square! A Night Out on Times Square, our new original production running June 10, 11, 12 and 17, 18, 19 at the Montgomery College Cultural Arts Center. (For tickets and more information click here: blt-online.org or call 202-796-3431.) In our blog series “Inside the Numbers” we take you backstage with the performers to discuss a sampling of the songs they’ll be presenting; today we’re going to explore how the guys are doing with their take on “You Could Drive a Person Crazy” from Company by Stephen Sondheim.

As a song that was originally sung by women but flipped in the revival, how fun is it to sing this Andrews sisters-style song?

Aref: Hilarious. Most funny of all if folks in the audience don’t even get that it’s gender bender, IF we sing with conviction! Women drive men crazy all the time: the whole premise behind “I Love Lucy”.

Note from the editor: except now you all know because you’ve gotten a sneak peek!

Justin: I love Sondheim and The Andrews Sisters, so it’s a perfect combination. And, it is really fun to sing this with Martin and Aref.

Martin: If you’re accustomed to hearing songs a specific way, gender swapping can make learning lyrics more difficult.  But, it can also add a whole other level with different, and sometimes more provocative, interpretations.

This song is quintessential Sondheim with a lot of words that come quickly, coupled with tight harmonies that are relentless, what’s the hardest part of learning it?

Note from the editor: thankfully these guys all have previous experience with Sondheim!

Martin: The close harmonies are very difficult. When you couple that with choreography and the Andrews Sisters, it becomes challenging. But Sondheim frequently is challenging.

Aref: Zero problem for me as I performed in a production of “Company” many years ago, where Musical Director Jeff Hayes actually watched to cheer me on. In this song, I have the melody line, so I find it super easy to learn, something all sopranos take for granted. 😉 I feel sympathy for the other guys in the trio; it’s Sondheim!!

Justin: The words aren’t that hard. I sang “Putting It Together” from Sunday in the Park with George a few years back (which I have never recovered from), so this will be far easier.  For me, the hard part will be the harmonies. I’ll get it, eventually.  The other two singers and Jeff will need to be patient.

These boyfriends have a lot to say about their girlfriend, Bobbi. Does this song remind you of any previous relationships?

Justin: Oy!

Note from the editor: maybe if you get lucky, Justin will share more of his experiences after a show if you can catch him in the lobby!

Martin:  Although the song doesn’t really remind me of any of my relationships, I am similar to the main character Bobby in that I am a single person who has navigated the dating arena.  

Aref: Um, um, the song reminds me of a lot of  relationships where, um, um, I was the Bobby. I have driven my share of women crazy…when I was living my life as a straight man. (Sorry, ladies!)

Have you seen the revival? How fun is the gender swapping and does it help make the show more relevant today?

Justin: I have not seen the revival. I don’t think the gender swap makes it any more or less relevant. 

Aref: I have not seen the revival but what I think would be a really fun gender bender would be my other song in the production – the heavy testosterone song “All I Ask of You” from “Phantom.” I would be the tormented opera singer, where I seek comfort in the arms of…Laura.

Martin: My final year of college, I actually played Bobby in Company.  I have also seen the original production as well as the revival.  To be honest, I think the show works better with the lead being a male.  The songs and the message ring truer for me that way. That said, I love to gender swap songs. It gives an artist so much more material and awards them with new possibilities and limitless interpretations.

You could drive a person crazy

You could drive a person mad

First you make a person hazy

So a person could be had

– Stephen Sondheim

Anything else you’d like to add?

Aref: This song is an interesting choice for gender bender as it is so Andrews Sisters. Wouldn’t it be fun to add some boy band style choreography?

Note from the editor: we can’t give away *all* our secrets…guess you’ll have to come see for yourself if the choreographer for this number worked in any boy band moves!

Justin: It will be fun to do.  Hopefully, the blocking will not be difficult!

Audition for A Night Out on Times Square!

Join us for A Night Out on Times Square! Bethesda Little Theatre is auditioning all voice parts for an original new musical revue featuring songs from all the Broadway shows you’ve been wishing you could see in one night but couldn’t… until now. Come From Away, Six, Dear Evan Hansen, Chicago, Tina: The Tina Turner Musical, Company, Waitress…. we’ve got them all and more. With opportunities for solos, small group numbers, and even some jazzy side trips to Birdland, you don’t want to miss your chance to shine.

Auditions will be held at Palisades Hub, 5200 Cathedral Ave NW, Washington, D.C. 20016 No reservations are required and people auditioning will be taken on a first come basis.

Proof of full COVID vaccination per CDC guidelines required at time of audition.

Audition dates: Sunday, February 20: 7 – 9 and Tuesday, February 22: 7 – 9

Audition requirements:
• Sing one song, ballad or up-tempo, that fits your voice. An accompanist will be provided. Be sure to bring music in the key you will be performing the song. No recorded tracks please.
• Be prepared to move for a simple dance combination.
• You will be asked to read a short portion from the script.
• You will be asked to complete an audition form. You may bring a resume to attach.
• You will be asked to complete a conflict calendar, so please have your conflicts available.

You must be 18 or older by the first rehearsal.

Auditions and Performances

Auditions for BLT’s annual stage production are usually held in January. Because of COVID-19, additional auditions for our next show will not take place until spring of 2022.

You can inquire about participation in our virtual roadshows and holiday show performances. E-mail bethesdalittletheatre@gmail.com if you’re interested!